Unlocking the Secrets: Why Do Depressed People Sleep So Much?


Unlocking the Secrets: Why Do Depressed People Sleep So Much?

Why Do Depressed People Sleep So Much? It’s a common question with a complex answer. Depression is a mental health disorder that can cause a variety of symptoms, including changes in sleep patterns.

Editor’s Note: This article on “Why Do Depressed People Sleep So Much” was published on [date] to provide a comprehensive insight into the topic. Understanding the reasons behind excessive sleep in depressed individuals is crucial for developing effective interventions and improving overall well-being.

Our team has analyzed research, consulted with experts, and compiled this guide to help you better understand why depressed people sleep so much. By exploring the underlying causes and potential benefits of excessive sleep, we aim to provide valuable information that can aid in addressing this common symptom of depression.

Key Differences:

Normal Sleep Depressed Sleep
Duration 7-9 hours per night Excessive sleepiness, often over 9 hours per night
Quality Restful, restorative sleep Poor sleep quality, frequent awakenings, and unrefreshing sleep
Timing Regular sleep-wake cycle Irregular sleep patterns, difficulty falling or staying asleep

Main Article Topics:

  • The Causes of Excessive Sleep in Depression
  • The Benefits of Excessive Sleep for Depressed People
  • How to Address Excessive Sleep in Depression
  • Conclusion

Why Do Depressed People Sleep So Much?

Excessive sleep is a common symptom of depression, and it can have a significant impact on a person’s life. Understanding the key aspects of why depressed people sleep so much can help us better address this symptom and improve the quality of life for those affected by depression.

  • Neurochemical Imbalances
  • Hormonal Dysregulation
  • Circadian Rhythm Disruption
  • Cognitive Impairment
  • Psychomotor Retardation
  • Emotional Exhaustion
  • Self-Medication
  • Avoidance Coping Mechanism
  • Underlying Medical Conditions
  • Medication Side Effects

These key aspects are interconnected and can contribute to the excessive sleep experienced by depressed individuals. For example, neurochemical imbalances, such as decreased serotonin and norepinephrine levels, can disrupt sleep-wake cycles and lead to hypersomnia. Hormonal dysregulation, particularly involving the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, can also alter sleep patterns and contribute to fatigue. Additionally, cognitive impairment and psychomotor retardation can make it difficult for depressed people to engage in activities that would normally promote wakefulness, leading to increased sleepiness.

It’s important to note that excessive sleep in depression is not simply a matter of laziness or lack of motivation. Rather, it is a complex symptom with multiple underlying causes that require proper diagnosis and treatment. By understanding the key aspects of why depressed people sleep so much, we can develop more effective interventions to address this symptom and improve the overall well-being of those affected by depression.

Neurochemical Imbalances


Neurochemical Imbalances, Sleep-Mental-Health

Neurochemical imbalances are believed to play a significant role in the development and persistence of depression, including its associated symptom of excessive sleep. These imbalances involve disruptions in the levels or functioning of certain neurotransmitters, such as serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine, which are crucial for regulating mood, sleep, and other bodily functions.

  • Serotonin Imbalance

    Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that is involved in mood regulation, sleep, and appetite. Low serotonin levels have been linked to depression and excessive sleepiness. This is because serotonin helps to promote wakefulness and alertness, and when its levels are low, people may experience fatigue and difficulty staying awake.

  • Norepinephrine Imbalance

    Norepinephrine is a neurotransmitter that is involved in arousal, attention, and mood. Low norepinephrine levels have been linked to depression and excessive sleepiness. This is because norepinephrine helps to promote wakefulness and alertness, and when its levels are low, people may experience fatigue and difficulty concentrating.

  • Dopamine Imbalance

    Dopamine is a neurotransmitter that is involved in motivation, reward, and pleasure. Low dopamine levels have been linked to depression and anhedonia, which is a loss of interest or pleasure in activities that were once enjoyable. This can lead to a lack of motivation to engage in activities that would normally promote wakefulness, such as socializing or exercising, which can contribute to excessive sleep.

It’s important to note that neurochemical imbalances are not the only factor that contributes to excessive sleep in depression. However, they play a significant role, and addressing these imbalances through medication or other treatments can be an effective way to improve sleep patterns and overall well-being in depressed individuals.

Hormonal Dysregulation


Hormonal Dysregulation, Sleep-Mental-Health

Hormonal dysregulation is a common feature of depression and is believed to contribute to the excessive sleep experienced by many depressed individuals. The hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a complex system that regulates the body’s response to stress and is involved in the production of hormones such as cortisol and adrenaline. In depression, the HPA axis can become dysregulated, leading to an overproduction of cortisol and a decrease in the production of other hormones, such as thyroid hormones.

Cortisol is a hormone that is involved in arousal and wakefulness. When cortisol levels are high, people are more likely to feel alert and energized. However, when cortisol levels are too high, as is often the case in depression, people may experience fatigue and difficulty waking up in the morning. Thyroid hormones are also involved in energy levels and metabolism. Low thyroid hormone levels can lead to fatigue, weight gain, and difficulty concentrating, all of which can contribute to excessive sleep.

In addition to the HPA axis, other hormonal systems can also be dysregulated in depression. For example, melatonin is a hormone that is involved in the regulation of sleep-wake cycles. In depression, melatonin levels may be decreased, which can lead to difficulty falling or staying asleep.

The hormonal dysregulation that occurs in depression can have a significant impact on sleep patterns. By understanding the connection between hormonal dysregulation and excessive sleep, we can better develop treatments to address this common symptom of depression and improve the quality of life for those affected by this condition.

Hormone Function Effect in Depression
Cortisol Arousal, wakefulness Overproduction can lead to fatigue, difficulty waking up
Thyroid hormones Energy levels, metabolism Low levels can lead to fatigue, weight gain, difficulty concentrating
Melatonin Sleep-wake cycles Decreased levels can lead to difficulty falling or staying asleep

Circadian Rhythm Disruption


Circadian Rhythm Disruption, Sleep-Mental-Health

Circadian rhythm disruption is a common feature of depression and is believed to contribute to the excessive sleep experienced by many depressed individuals. The circadian rhythm is a natural sleep-wake cycle that is regulated by the body’s internal clock. This clock is located in the hypothalamus and is responsible for regulating a variety of bodily functions, including sleep, body temperature, and hormone production.

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In depression, the circadian rhythm can become disrupted, leading to difficulty falling or staying asleep, waking up too early, or sleeping too much. This disruption can be caused by a variety of factors, including changes in sleep-wake patterns, light exposure, and physical activity. It can also be caused by medications used to treat depression, such as antidepressants and mood stabilizers.

Circadian rhythm disruption can have a significant impact on a person’s quality of life. It can lead to fatigue, difficulty concentrating, and impaired judgment. It can also worsen other symptoms of depression, such as low mood and anhedonia. In some cases, circadian rhythm disruption can even lead to suicidal thoughts and behaviors.

Understanding the connection between circadian rhythm disruption and depression is essential for developing effective treatments for this condition. By addressing circadian rhythm disruption, we can improve sleep patterns and overall well-being in depressed individuals.

Normal Circadian Rhythm Disrupted Circadian Rhythm
Sleep-wake patterns Regular, consistent sleep-wake cycle Irregular, inconsistent sleep-wake cycle
Light exposure Regular exposure to sunlight during the day Irregular or lack of exposure to sunlight during the day
Physical activity Regular physical activity Irregular or lack of physical activity
Medications Medications that do not disrupt the circadian rhythm Medications that disrupt the circadian rhythm (e.g., antidepressants, mood stabilizers)

Cognitive Impairment


Cognitive Impairment, Sleep-Mental-Health

Cognitive impairment is a common symptom of depression and can significantly contribute to excessive sleep. It refers to a decline in cognitive abilities, such as attention, concentration, memory, and problem-solving. This impairment can make it difficult for depressed individuals to engage in activities that would normally promote wakefulness, leading to increased sleepiness and fatigue.

  • Attention and Concentration Deficits

    Depressed individuals often have difficulty paying attention and concentrating on tasks. This can make it difficult for them to stay awake during the day, as they may find it hard to focus on their work or other activities. Additionally, difficulty concentrating can lead to problems with memory, as they may forget important information or have trouble recalling things.

  • Memory Impairment

    Memory problems are another common symptom of depression. Depressed individuals may have difficulty remembering recent events, names, or faces. They may also have trouble learning new information. This can make it difficult for them to function in everyday life, as they may forget important appointments or tasks.

  • Problem-Solving Deficits

    Depressed individuals may also have difficulty solving problems. This can make it difficult for them to make decisions, plan for the future, or cope with stressful situations. Problem-solving deficits can also lead to increased sleepiness, as depressed individuals may feel overwhelmed and exhausted by the effort of trying to solve problems.

  • Psychomotor Retardation

    Psychomotor retardation is a symptom of depression that involves a slowing down of physical and mental activity. This can lead to fatigue, difficulty concentrating, and problems with coordination and movement. Psychomotor retardation can also make it difficult for depressed individuals to engage in activities that would normally promote wakefulness, such as exercise or socializing.

Cognitive impairment is a significant symptom of depression that can have a major impact on a person’s quality of life. By understanding the connection between cognitive impairment and excessive sleep, we can better develop treatments to address these symptoms and improve the overall well-being of depressed individuals.

Psychomotor Retardation


Psychomotor Retardation, Sleep-Mental-Health

Psychomotor retardation is a symptom of depression that involves a slowing down of physical and mental activity. This can lead to fatigue, difficulty concentrating, and problems with coordination and movement. Psychomotor retardation can also make it difficult for depressed individuals to engage in activities that would normally promote wakefulness, such as exercise or socializing.

  • Reduced Physical Activity

    Depressed individuals with psychomotor retardation may experience a decrease in physical activity. They may feel too tired or fatigued to engage in activities that they once enjoyed, such as sports, hobbies, or even simple tasks like walking. This reduction in physical activity can lead to further fatigue and sleepiness.

  • Cognitive Slowing

    Psychomotor retardation can also affect cognitive functioning. Depressed individuals may experience difficulty concentrating, making decisions, or processing information. This cognitive slowing can make it difficult to stay awake and alert during the day.

  • Loss of Motivation

    Psychomotor retardation can lead to a loss of motivation. Depressed individuals may lose interest in activities that they once enjoyed and may have difficulty initiating or completing tasks. This loss of motivation can make it difficult to engage in activities that would normally promote wakefulness, such as work or school.

  • Social Withdrawal

    Psychomotor retardation can also lead to social withdrawal. Depressed individuals may avoid social interactions because they feel too tired or fatigued to participate. This social withdrawal can lead to isolation and further worsen depression and excessive sleep.

Psychomotor retardation is a significant symptom of depression that can have a major impact on a person’s quality of life. By understanding the connection between psychomotor retardation and excessive sleep, we can better develop treatments to address these symptoms and improve the overall well-being of depressed individuals.

Emotional Exhaustion


Emotional Exhaustion, Sleep-Mental-Health

Emotional exhaustion is a state of extreme fatigue that results from prolonged or intense emotional stress. It is a common symptom of depression and can significantly contribute to excessive sleep. When a person is emotionally exhausted, they may feel drained, overwhelmed, and unable to cope with the demands of daily life.

There are a number of reasons why emotional exhaustion can lead to excessive sleep. First, emotional exhaustion can disrupt the body’s natural sleep-wake cycle. When a person is emotionally exhausted, their body may produce less melatonin, a hormone that helps to regulate sleep. This can make it difficult to fall asleep and stay asleep at night.

Second, emotional exhaustion can lead to cognitive impairment, which can make it difficult to concentrate and focus on tasks. This can make it difficult to stay awake during the day, as the person may be constantly struggling to keep up with their thoughts and activities.

Third, emotional exhaustion can lead to physical fatigue, which can make it difficult to engage in activities that would normally promote wakefulness, such as exercise or socializing. This can lead to further sleepiness and fatigue.

Understanding the connection between emotional exhaustion and excessive sleep is important for developing effective treatments for depression. By addressing emotional exhaustion, we can improve sleep patterns and overall well-being in depressed individuals.

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Here are some practical tips for managing emotional exhaustion:

  • Identify the sources of your emotional exhaustion and try to reduce or eliminate them.
  • Set realistic goals and don’t try to do too much.
  • Take breaks throughout the day to rest and recharge.
  • Engage in activities that you enjoy and that make you feel good.
  • Talk to a therapist or counselor about your emotional exhaustion.

Self-Medication


Self-Medication, Sleep-Mental-Health

Self-medication is a common coping mechanism for individuals with depression. It involves using substances, such as alcohol or drugs, to alleviate symptoms of depression. While self-medication may provide temporary relief, it can ultimately worsen depression and lead to a number of negative consequences.

One of the reasons why depressed people may turn to self-medication is to improve their sleep. Many people with depression experience insomnia, difficulty falling asleep, or staying asleep. Alcohol and drugs can act as sedatives, helping people to fall asleep more easily. However, the sleep that is induced by substances is often not restful or restorative. In the long run, self-medication can actually worsen insomnia and other symptoms of depression.

In addition to the negative impact on sleep, self-medication can also lead to a number of other problems, including:

  • Addiction
  • Liver damage
  • Heart disease
  • Stroke
  • Cancer
  • Death

If you are struggling with depression, it is important to seek professional help. There are a number of effective treatments for depression that can help you to manage your symptoms and improve your quality of life. Self-medication is not a safe or effective way to treat depression. It can actually make your depression worse and lead to a number of other serious problems.

Here are some tips for avoiding self-medication:

  • Talk to your doctor about your depression.
  • Seek professional help from a therapist or counselor.
  • Join a support group for people with depression.
  • Find healthy ways to cope with stress, such as exercise, yoga, or meditation.
  • Avoid alcohol and drugs.

Avoidance Coping Mechanism


Avoidance Coping Mechanism, Sleep-Mental-Health

An avoidance coping mechanism is a strategy employed by individuals to manage difficult emotions or situations by avoiding or withdrawing from them. In the context of depression, avoidance coping can manifest in various ways and contribute to excessive sleep.

  • Emotional Avoidance

    Depressed individuals may avoid activities or situations that trigger negative emotions, such as sadness, anxiety, or guilt. By avoiding these triggers, they attempt to protect themselves from emotional pain. However, avoidance can lead to isolation, social withdrawal, and a reduced ability to cope with difficult emotions in the long run.

  • Behavioral Avoidance

    Depressed individuals may avoid engaging in activities that require effort or concentration. They may withdraw from work, school, or social obligations, as these activities can be overwhelming or anxiety-provoking. Behavioral avoidance can lead to a decline in overall functioning and a loss of interest in activities that were once enjoyable.

  • Cognitive Avoidance

    Depressed individuals may avoid thinking about or acknowledging their negative thoughts or feelings. They may engage in distracting activities, such as excessive sleep, to suppress or avoid these thoughts. Cognitive avoidance can prevent individuals from processing and addressing their emotions, leading to a perpetuation of depressive symptoms.

  • Social Avoidance

    Depressed individuals may avoid social interactions or withdraw from relationships due to feelings of worthlessness, shame, or fear of rejection. Social avoidance can lead to isolation, loneliness, and a lack of social support, all of which can worsen depression and contribute to excessive sleep.

Avoidance coping mechanisms, while initially providing a sense of relief from negative emotions, can ultimately reinforce and perpetuate depression. By avoiding triggers and withdrawing from activities, depressed individuals may miss out on opportunities for positive experiences, social support, and personal growth. Excessive sleep can become a maladaptive way of coping with depression, further isolating individuals and hindering their recovery.

Underlying Medical Conditions


Underlying Medical Conditions, Sleep-Mental-Health

The connection between underlying medical conditions and excessive sleep in depression is significant, as certain medical conditions can contribute to or exacerbate depression and its associated symptoms. Understanding this relationship is crucial for comprehensive patient care and effective treatment planning.

One common underlying medical condition linked to depression and excessive sleep is hypothyroidism. Hypothyroidism occurs when the thyroid gland does not produce enough thyroid hormones, leading to a slowdown of the body’s metabolism. This metabolic slowdown can result in fatigue, lethargy, and difficulty concentrating, all of which can contribute to increased sleepiness and a desire for excessive sleep.

Another underlying medical condition that can impact sleep patterns in depression is anemia. Anemia, characterized by a deficiency of red blood cells or hemoglobin, can lead to fatigue, weakness, and shortness of breath. These symptoms can interfere with daily activities and contribute to feelings of exhaustion, making individuals more likely to seek excessive sleep as a way to compensate for their reduced energy levels.

Furthermore, chronic pain conditions can also contribute to excessive sleep in depression. Chronic pain can disrupt sleep patterns, making it difficult to fall or stay asleep. The resulting sleep deprivation can worsen mood symptoms and lead to increased daytime sleepiness. The interplay between chronic pain and depression can create a vicious cycle, with each condition exacerbating the other.

It is important for healthcare professionals to consider underlying medical conditions when assessing excessive sleep in depressed patients. By addressing these underlying medical conditions, it may be possible to improve sleep patterns, alleviate depressive symptoms, and enhance overall well-being.


Table: Underlying Medical Conditions and Their Impact on Sleep in Depression

Underlying Medical Condition Impact on Sleep in Depression
Hypothyroidism Fatigue, lethargy, difficulty concentrating, contributing to excessive sleepiness
Anemia Fatigue, weakness, shortness of breath, leading to increased sleepiness
Chronic pain conditions Disrupted sleep patterns, sleep deprivation, worsening mood symptoms, and increased daytime sleepiness

Medication Side Effects


Medication Side Effects, Sleep-Mental-Health

The relationship between medication side effects and excessive sleep in depression is a crucial consideration in patient care and treatment planning. Many medications used to treat depression can have side effects that impact sleep patterns, contributing to the overall symptom burden experienced by individuals with depression.

One common medication side effect that can lead to excessive sleep is sedation. Sedation is a state of drowsiness or reduced alertness that can be caused by certain antidepressants, antipsychotics, and other medications used to treat depression. When these medications are taken, they can interfere with the normal sleep-wake cycle, making it difficult for individuals to stay awake during the day and leading to increased sleepiness.

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For example, tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are two classes of antidepressants that are commonly prescribed for depression. TCAs have anticholinergic properties, which can cause sedation as a side effect. SSRIs, while generally better tolerated than TCAs, can also cause sedation, especially at higher doses.

Another medication side effect that can contribute to excessive sleep is weight gain. Weight gain is a common side effect of many antidepressants, including TCAs, SSRIs, and atypical antidepressants. Weight gain can lead to increased fatigue and daytime sleepiness, as it can put strain on the body and make it more difficult to engage in physical activity.

Furthermore, some medications used to treat depression can disrupt sleep architecture, affecting the quality of sleep and leading to excessive daytime sleepiness. For example, certain antidepressants can suppress rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, which is an important stage of sleep for memory consolidation and mood regulation. Disruption of REM sleep can result in unrefreshing sleep and increased daytime sleepiness.

Understanding the connection between medication side effects and excessive sleep is essential for healthcare professionals and patients alike. By carefully monitoring for and managing medication side effects, it is possible to mitigate their impact on sleep patterns and improve overall treatment outcomes for individuals with depression.


Table: Common Medication Side Effects that can Contribute to Excessive Sleep in Depression

Medication Class Common Side Effects Impact on Sleep
Tricyclic Antidepressants (TCAs) Sedation, anticholinergic effects Drowsiness, difficulty staying awake during the day
Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) Sedation, weight gain Daytime sleepiness, fatigue
Atypical Antidepressants Sedation, weight gain Increased sleepiness, difficulty waking up in the morning

FAQs about “Why Do Depressed People Sleep So Much?”

This section provides concise answers to frequently asked questions regarding the relationship between depression and excessive sleep. Understanding these FAQs can enhance our knowledge and dispel common misconceptions surrounding this topic.

Question 1: Why do depressed people often experience excessive sleep?

Answer: Excessive sleep in depression is a complex issue influenced by neurochemical imbalances, hormonal dysregulation, circadian rhythm disruption, cognitive impairment, psychomotor retardation, emotional exhaustion, self-medication, avoidance coping mechanisms, underlying medical conditions, and medication side effects.

Question 2: How does depression impact sleep patterns?

Answer: Depression can disrupt the normal sleep-wake cycle, leading to difficulty falling or staying asleep, waking up too early, or sleeping excessively. Additionally, depression can worsen insomnia and other sleep disorders.

Question 3: Is excessive sleep a symptom of depression?

Answer: Yes, excessive sleep is a common symptom of depression, although it is not experienced by all individuals with depression. It is important to note that excessive sleep can also be caused by other factors, such as underlying medical conditions or medication side effects.

Question 4: How can excessive sleep affect daily life?

Answer: Excessive sleep can significantly impair daily functioning. It can lead to fatigue, difficulty concentrating, reduced productivity, and social withdrawal. These effects can contribute to a decline in overall quality of life.

Question 5: What are some ways to manage excessive sleep in depression?

Answer: Managing excessive sleep in depression may involve a combination of strategies, including lifestyle changes, such as regular exercise and a healthy sleep routine; cognitive-behavioral therapy to address negative thoughts and behaviors that perpetuate excessive sleep; and medication to regulate sleep patterns and improve mood.

Question 6: When should I seek professional help for excessive sleep?

Answer: It is advisable to seek professional help if excessive sleep is significantly interfering with daily life, causing distress, or is accompanied by other symptoms of depression. A healthcare professional can evaluate the underlying causes of excessive sleep and recommend appropriate treatment options.

Summary: Understanding the relationship between depression and excessive sleep is crucial for effective management of this common symptom. By addressing the underlying causes and implementing appropriate strategies, individuals with depression can improve their sleep patterns and overall well-being.

Transition to the next article section: For further insights into depression and sleep, continue reading the next section, where we explore the various treatment options available for excessive sleep in depression.

Tips for Managing Excessive Sleep in Depression

Excessive sleep can be a debilitating symptom of depression, impacting daily life and overall well-being. By understanding the underlying causes and implementing effective strategies, individuals can mitigate excessive sleep and improve their quality of life.

Tip 1: Establish a Regular Sleep-Wake Cycle

Maintaining a consistent sleep-wake cycle, even on weekends, helps regulate the body’s natural sleep-wake rhythm. Aim for 7-9 hours of sleep each night.

Tip 2: Create a Conducive Sleep Environment

Ensure your bedroom is dark, quiet, and cool. Use blackout curtains, earplugs, or a white noise machine to minimize distractions. A comfortable bed and appropriate bedding can also enhance sleep quality.

Tip 3: Engage in Regular Exercise

Physical activity can improve sleep quality and duration. Aim for at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise most days of the week. Avoid exercising too close to bedtime, as it can interfere with sleep.

Tip 4: Avoid Caffeine and Alcohol Before Bed

Caffeine and alcohol can disrupt sleep patterns. Avoid consuming them several hours before bedtime. Instead, opt for calming beverages like chamomile tea or warm milk.

Tip 5: Get Sunlight Exposure During the Day

Sunlight helps regulate the body’s natural sleep-wake cycle. Aim for at least 30 minutes of sunlight exposure each day, particularly in the morning.

Tip 6: Consider Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

CBT is a type of psychotherapy that can help individuals identify and change negative thoughts and behaviors that contribute to excessive sleep. CBT can improve sleep patterns and overall mood.

Tip 7: Explore Medication Options

In some cases, medication may be necessary to regulate sleep patterns and improve mood in depression. Antidepressants and sleep medications can be effective in reducing excessive sleep and improving sleep quality.

Summary: Managing excessive sleep in depression requires a multifaceted approach. By implementing these tips and working closely with healthcare professionals, individuals can mitigate this symptom and improve their overall well-being.

Transition to the article’s conclusion: Understanding the causes and implementing effective strategies for excessive sleep in depression are crucial for improving sleep patterns and enhancing quality of life.

Why Do Depressed People Sleep So Much

Excessive sleep is a prevalent symptom of depression, significantly impacting individuals’ daily lives and overall well-being. This article has explored the multifaceted causes of excessive sleep in depression, ranging from neurochemical imbalances to psychological and environmental factors.

Understanding these causes is crucial for developing effective strategies to manage excessive sleep and improve sleep patterns in depressed individuals. By implementing lifestyle changes, seeking professional help, and considering medication options when necessary, individuals can mitigate this symptom and enhance their quality of life.

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